Inside Out: Different Doesn’t Have to Mean Divided (Sermon Series)

Sermon Graphic

Have you looked closely at the sermon graphics for the “Inside Out” sermon series? There is a lot of symbolism at work. Here’s what’s behind the design: The left side of the graphic is purple because in the movie Inside Out, purple is the color that represents fear. It is so often fear that causes us to divide ourselves, defining who is “in” & who is “out” while we often desperately try to stay on the inside. Note also that there is a defined box that forms a boundary around the word “inside.” All of the other colors that represent different emotions in the movie––along with more visual variety––are on the right side of the graphic, on the “outside,” where there can be so much more vitality when we integrate diversity and include “the other” rather than fearing it/them/her/him, etc.

Have you looked closely at the sermon graphics for the “Inside Out” sermon series? There is a lot of symbolism at work. Here’s what’s behind the design:

The left side of the graphic is purple because in the movie Inside Out, purple is the color that represents fear. It is so often fear that causes us to divide ourselves, defining who is “in” & who is “out” while we often desperately try to stay on the inside. Note also that there is a defined box that forms a boundary around the word “inside.” All of the other colors that represent different emotions in the movie––along with more visual variety––are on the right side of the graphic, on the “outside,” where there can be so much more vitality when we integrate diversity and include “the other” rather than fearing it/them/her/him, etc.

Spotify Playlist for reflection

In addition the songs we'll sing together each Sunday, here is a Spotify playlist compiled to support your reflection on the messages shared in this series. Please take time to listen while hopefully enjoying both encouragements and challenges.

 

Book Suggestions

Fear of the Other: No Fear in Love by William H Willimon

Fear of the Other: No Fear in Love by William H Willimon

I Beg to Differ: Navigating Difficult Conversations With Truth and Love by Tim Muehlhoff

I Beg to Differ: Navigating Difficult Conversations With Truth and Love by Tim Muehlhoff


week 1

sept. 11th

“Love is our true destiny. We do not find the meaning of life by ourselves alone - we find it with another.”
― Thomas Merton, Love and Living
“I define connection as the energy that exists between people when they feel seen, heard, and valued; when they can give and receive without judgment; and when they derive sustenance and strength from the relationship.”
― Brené Brown

Matthew 5:21-24

In the midst of disagreements, arguments and name calling, Jesus calls us to be reconciled with one another. To be reconciled, we need to look at what’s going on under the surface. There is a lot that happens in a person’s life that informs their decision-making.

Questions for Reflection

  • Do I assume most people see the world as I do? Do I consider the other person’s point of view before I speak? Do I acknowledge objections?
  • In attempt to keep the peace do I regularly avoid difficult issues?  (Muehlhoff, 159) 

  


Muehlhoff, T. (2014). I beg to differ: Navigating difficult conversations with truth and love. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.


Week 2

sept. 18th

Download & share if you wish!

Download & share if you wish!

“Spirituality is recognizing and celebrating that we are all inextricably connected to each other by a power greater than all of us, and that our connection to that power and to one another is grounded in love and compassion. Practicing spirituality brings a sense of perspective, meaning and purpose to our lives.”
― Brené Brown, The Gifts of  Imperfection: Let Go of  Who You Think You're Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are

When we perceive someone is different than us, we start creating distinctions between “us” and “them.” Labeling someone as “other” creates a blind spot in our lives. Christ breaks down any dividing walls we create and helps us to see that all belong.

 


Week 3

sept. 25th

Cultivating Empathy

“I therefore, the prisoner in the Lord, beg you to lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.”  Ephesians 4:1-3

Empathy allows us to imagine the thoughts, feeling and perspective of another.  It is what can allow us to remain connected & united, even in the midst of disagreement. Cultivating empathy can help us become better listeners who engage in thoughtful and respectful dialogue.

 

When engaging in conversation, ask yourself:

  1. What does this person believe? Am I listening and accurately understanding them?
  2. Why does s/he believe it? How would I feel if I had her/his perspective?
  3. Where do we agree? What common questions are we asking? What values do we share?
  4. Based on all I’ve learned, how should I proceed? How I can I treat each person as a child of God?

Muehlhoff, T. (2014). I beg to differ: Navigating difficult conversations with truth and love. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

 

 “6 Habits of highly empathetic people” by Roman Krznaric

  1. Cultivate curiosity about strangers by asking about their life.
  2. Challenge prejudices you may have by spending time with the “other.”
  3. Try another persons life by spending a day doing their job, engaging in a new sport, or observing another religion.
  4. Listen hard and open up with your own emotions and experiences.
  5. Think beyond individuals to whole groups of people in our culture might be labeled as “other.”
  6. Develop an ambitious imagination by empathizing with your enemy.

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/six_habits_of_highly_empathic_people1

 

What is the best way to ease someone's pain and suffering? In this beautifully animated RSA Short, Dr Brené Brown reminds us that we can only create a genuine empathic connection if we are brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities.