This week we continue listening to the conversation we began last week, from 17:39-35:02 and discuss things like:

  • How House for All Sinners and Saints (Nadia's church) does worship
  • Theology as something experienced to be true
  • The importance of an emphasis on grace
  • Christianity's emphasis on incarnation teaches us to pay attention to human bodies, which carry stories
  • Tattooing and piercing as personalization of the body
  • Reality checks about churches being places where people will get hurt and disappointed, but can stay and experience God's ability to heal and redeem our mistakes
  • Transparent leaders being more trustworthy
  • The difference between apologizing for our mistakes vs. apologizing for who you are

oct. 16th

nadia bolz-weber

Nadia Bolz-Weber is the tattooed, Lutheran pastor of the House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, a church where a chocolate fountain, a blessing of the bicycles, and serious liturgy come together. She's a face of the Emerging Church — redefining what church is, with deep reverence for tradition. This is the unedited, unabridged version of their interview, recorded with a live audience at the Wild Goose Festival in Hot Springs, North Carolina.


Today we'll listen & discuss the first 17 minutes (& 38 seconds) of this conversation. For more information about Nadia's church, visit http://www.houseforall.org/ and for more about Nadia herself or to find her books, visit http://www.nadiabolzweber.com/

OCT. 9th

Nadia bolz-weber

Nadia Bolz-Weber is the tattooed, Lutheran pastor of the House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, a church where a chocolate fountain, a blessing of the bicycles, and serious liturgy come together. She's a face of the Emerging Church — redefining what church is, with deep reverence for tradition. This is the unedited, unabridged version of their interview, recorded with a live audience at the Wild Goose Festival in Hot Springs, North Carolina.

Video Credits Producer: Trent Gilliss Camera: Angel Huertas, Julio Marin Audio: Chris Heagle Editor: J.D. O'Brien


Reality is paradoxical and complementary. Non-dual thinking is the highest level of consciousness. Divine union, not private perfection, is the goal of all religion. 

Oct. 2nd

alternative orthodoxy: theme #7


The path of descent is the path of transformation. Darkness, failure, relapse, death, and woundedness are our primary teachers, rather than ideas or doctrines.

SEPT. 25TH

alternative orthodoxy: theme #6


sept. 18th

alternative orthodoxy: theme #5

The separate self is the problem, whereas most religion and most people make the “shadow self” the problem. This leads to denial, pretending, and projecting instead of real transformation into the Divine. 

previous weeks

We've been listening to parts of a podcast conversation between Richard Rohr and Rob Bell on these 7 themes of an "Alternative Orthodoxy"...

The Franciscan Alternative Orthodoxy (7 themes)

  • Scripture as validated by experience, and experience as validated by tradition, are good scales for one’s spiritual worldview. (Method)
  • If God is Trinity and Jesus is the face of God, then it is a benevolent universe. God is not someone to be afraid of, but is the Ground of Being and on our side.(Foundation)
  • There is only one Reality. Any distinction between natural and supernatural, sacred and profane is a bogus one. (Frame)
  • Everything belongs and no one needs to be scapegoated or excluded. Evil and illusion only need to be named and exposed truthfully, and they die in exposure to the light. (Ecumenism)
  • The separate self is the problem, whereas most religion and most people make the “shadow self” the problem. This leads to denial, pretending, and projecting instead of real transformation into the Divine. (Transformation)
  • The path of descent is the path of transformation. Darkness, failure, relapse, death, and woundedness are our primary teachers, rather than ideas or doctrines. (Process)
  • Reality is paradoxical and complementary. Non-dual thinking is the highest level of consciousness. Divine union, not private perfection, is the goal of all religion. (Goal)